Women in IT: Camilla Holmstoel Andreasen

5 June 2024

"IT is about interest and ability, not gender."

Camilla Holmstoel Andreasen thought she would design clothes for a living, but a chance conversation changed everything. Today, she works as a Consultant at Delegate, combining her creative visualization skills with technical expertise as a software engineer.

Camilla Holmstoel Andreasen has always been interested in fashion, sewing, and designing her own clothes. It is, therefore, far from a foregone conclusion that she will end up as a software engineer, as she graduated from VIA University College in 2019 with a degree in Design Technology specializing in Pattern Design (Constructor).

At a party, she talks to a friend who tells her about her software engineering degree, and it immediately catches her interest:

"At the time, I had no idea you could become a software engineer. I didn't even know what code was, but I thought it sounded exciting and something I had to try."

Despite her limited knowledge of the subject, she began studying software engineering and quickly became engrossed in the possibilities that coding offered.

"The coolest part of coding is when you finally get it to work! When you sit there, and you've been struggling with a problem for hours, and it finally comes together, you feel like you've achieved something great."

Creativity meets code

While others might see the leap from clothing designer to software engineer as a big jump, Camilla sees a natural connection between her creative background in the fashion industry and her current work with IT. Both fields require an understanding of structures and visual thinking:

"Design is about visualizing how things work together. Both clothing patterns and code are structures where the individual parts must fit perfectly to create a harmonious result."

Camilla's ability to visualize complex patterns has been an advantage in her work in software development, where she needs to imagine how different code elements work together.

Today, as a Consultant in Delegate's Business Applications team, she enjoys the challenge of making the small details fit together and the satisfaction of seeing her work come together:

"The coolest part of coding is when you finally get it to work! When you sit there, and you've been struggling with a problem for hours, and it finally comes together, you feel like you've achieved something great. Ninety-nine percent of the time, it doesn't work, but that one percent where it just works, it's almost impossible to describe."

It is about interest, not gender

Men dominate the IT industry, but this has never deterred Camilla or been a problem. She has experienced prejudices about what a software engineer "should" look like, but she has learned to ignore the stereotypes and focus on her skills and enjoyment of the work:

"Code is code, and if you like it, it doesn't matter if you're male or female. It's about interest and ability, not gender."

However, she recognizes that representation is important and that more women in the industry can bring diversity and new perspectives. That's why she also encourages women to try their hand at IT, even if they may not have prior experience:

"I had never coded a line when I started, but if you even consider it, do it. There are so many roles in the IT industry, so you can find something that suits your interests and strengths."

Camilla is, therefore, optimistic about the future for women in IT and believes it's important to emphasize the positive community among women in IT:

"We are here to support each other and show we can do well. We need to focus on finding the best talent, regardless of gender."

Camilla will share her perspectives on being a woman in the software industry this fall when she speaks at a networking meeting in She# (pronounced She Sharp), a new network for female and nonbinary engineering students at Aarhus University.

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